Title IX


Title IX Information on Sexual Harassment and Assault

Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 is a federal law that prohibits sex discrimination in education. It reads: "No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance." Sex discrimination includes sexual harassment and sexual assault.

Sexual harassment in education is an unwelcome behavior of a sexual nature that interferes with a student's ability to learn, study, work or participate in school activities. Sexual harassment involves a range of behavior from mild annoyances to sexual assault and rape.

Title IX also protects lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender students and employees from discrimination, harassment, sexual assault and sexual violence including discrimination, physical aggression, intimidation, or hostility based on sex, sex-stereotyping or failure to conform to stereotypical gender norms.

Joliet Junior College (JJC) has committed itself, unequivocally, to ensuring a working and learning environment in which the dignity of every individual is respected. JJC is committed to providing an environment for employees, students, and campus visitors that is free from illegal harassment based on race, color, religion, ethnicity, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, age, disability, or veteran status.  Likewise the College prohibits discrimination on the basis of gender in all College activities and programs.  Any form of sexual harassment, including sexual assault and sexual violence, is a violation of College policy and the Code of Student Conduct. 

At JJC, we strive to comply with all applicable legal requirements prohibiting harassment against any member of the JJC community. In addition to facing College consequences, those who engage in sexual harassment, sexual assault and/or sexual violence may also be prosecuted criminally.

Higher education institutions have a duty to prevent harassment, to have policies against it, to investigate complaints, and to take prompt action to stop harassment when it occurs.

If you experience sexual harassment or assault or know someone that has, we encourage you report it so that we can help maintain a work and academic environment free of unlawful harassment.

If you would like to review the college full procedure for Title IX, please click the link (PDF) below.

Prohibition of Sexual Discrimination Harassment and Misconduct for Students

If you want to learn more about your rights, or if you believe that a school district, college, or university is violating Federal law, you may contact the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, at (800) 421-3481 or ocr@ed.gov. You can also fill out a complaint form online.

Consumer Disclosures

Sexual Misconduct and Title IX

Although Title IX is commonly associated with sex-based discrimination in athletics, the law is much broader. Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 is a federal law that provides: No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subject to discrimination under any educational program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance. Title IX prohibits sex discrimination in all college programs and activities, including, but not limited to, admissions, recruiting, financial aid, academic programs, student services, counseling and guidance, discipline, class assignment, grading, recreation, athletics, housing, and employment. Sexual harassment and sexual violence are forms of sex discrimination prohibited by Title IX. Title IX also prohibits retaliation against people for making or participating in complaints of sex discrimination.

  • Laws, Definitions, & Facts

    Laws

    Title IX

    Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (Title IX) is a federal civil rights law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in federally funded educational programs and activities. Under Title IX, sexual assault and sexual harassment are forms of discrimination on the basis of sex. The Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights, which enforces Title IX, has recently provided detailed guidance on how educational institutions like JJC must investigate and respond to complaints of sexual assault and sexual harassment. Learn more in Questions and Answers on Title IX and Sexual Violence from the Department of Education.

    The Clery Act

    The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (the Clery Act) is a federal law and accompanying regulations that require colleges and universities to disclose certain timely and annual information about campus crime, and security and safety policies. Compliance with the Clery Act is a condition for universities, like JJC, that participate in the federal student aid program, and is administered by the U.S. Department of Education's Federal Student Aid Office. As a part of its Clery program, Joliet Junior College collects and publishes statistical information on crimes occurring on and around campus, as well as relevant crime and safety information, in its annual crime and safety report

    The Violence Against Women Act (VAWA)

    The federal Violence Against Women Act amendments and accompanying regulations (VAWA) clarify the duties of universities to investigate and respond to reports of sexual assault, stalking, and dating and domestic violence, and to publish policies and procedures related to the handling of these cases. Under VAWA, universities also must provide training to the campus communities on sexual misconduct. Compliance with VAWA is a condition for universities, like JJC, that participate in the federal student aid program, and is administered by the Department of Education's Federal Student Aid Office. New VAWA regulations were published by the U.S. Department of Education in October 2014 and became effective July 1, 2105.

    Illinois Gender Violence Act

    Under this Act, a person who has been subjected to gender-related violence may bring a civil action for damages, injunctive relief, or other appropriate relief against a person or persons perpetrating that gender-related violence. You can read more about this act on the Illinois General Assembly website.

    Definitions

    Sex Discrimination

    Sex discrimination includes any behavior or communication that improperly singles out, stigmatizes, victimizes, or otherwise subjects an individual to unequal treatment to his or her detriment on the basis of his/her sex, gender identity, or failure to conform to stereotypical notions of masculinity or femininity. Sex discrimination includes, but is not limited to, verbal abuse, sexual harassment, sexual violence, and other acts of sexual misconduct. Sexual harassment of students, including sexual violence, interferes with a student's right to receive an education free from discrimination and, in the case of sexual violence, dating/relationship violence and stalking, are crimes.

    Sexual Harassment

    Sexual harassment includes unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature, or acts that an individual did not request or invite and that are regarded as undesirable or offensive when:

    1. Submission to such conduct is made explicitly or implicitly a term of condition of a student's individual's education, academic advancement, evaluation, grades or employment;
    2. Submission to or rejection of such conduct is deemed to be used as the basis for an educational or employment decision affecting the individual;
    3. Such conduct has the purpose or effect of substantially interfering with an individual's educational or work performance, or creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive educational or working environment; or
    4. Such conduct denies or limits a student's ability to participate in or receive the benefits, services or opportunities of JJC's programs or activities or the individual's employment access, benefits or opportunities.

    Examples of conduct of a sexual nature include:

    1. Verbal: Specific demands for sexual favors, sexual innuendoes, sexually suggestive comments, jokes of a sexual nature, sexual propositions, or sexual threats.
    2. Non-Verbal: Sexually suggestive emails, other writings, articles or documents, objects or pictures, graphic commentaries, suggestive or insulting sounds or gestures, leering, whistling, or obscene gestures.
    3. Physical: Nonconsensual touching, pinching, brushing the body, or any unwelcome or coerced sexual activity, including sexual assault.
    Non-Consensual Sexual Intercourse

    Includes any intentional or knowing contact, however slight, between the sex organ, mouth or anus of one person, by the sex organ, mouth, or anus of another person or the intrusion however slight of any body part including a finger(s), animal, or foreign object into the sex organ, anus or mouth of another by force or threat of force; intimidation; without the consent of the victim; or when the victim is unable to give consent due to age, diminished mental capacity, or intoxication.

    Other Sexual Misconduct

    Includes sexual assault, sexual exploitation, dating violence, domestic violence, sexual violence and stalking.

    Sexual Exploitation

    Occurs when an individual takes non-consensual or abusive sexual advantage of another for his/her own advantage or benefit, or to benefit or advantage anyone other than the one being exploited, and that behavior does not otherwise constitute one of the other sexual misconduct offenses. Sexual exploitation includes invasion of sexual privacy, prostituting another individual, non-consensual video, photographing, or audio taping of sexual activity, going beyond the boundaries of consent, engaging in voyeurism, knowingly transmitting an STI or HIV to another individual, exposing one's genitals in non-consensual circumstances, inducing another to expose their genitals.

    Sexual Violence

    Physical sexual acts perpetuated against a person's will or where a person is incapable of giving consent (e.g. due to the person's age, use of drugs or alcohol, or because an intellectual or other disability prevents the person from having the capacity to give consent). Sexual violence includes, but is not limited to, rape, sexual assault, sexual battery, sexual abuse and sexual coercion. All such acts of sexual violence are forms of sex discrimination prohibited by Title IX.

    Dating/Relationship Violence

    The term dating violence means violence committed by a person: 1) who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim; and 2) where the existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on a consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship.

    Dating Violence can include, but is not limited to:

    1. Physical violence: hitting, slapping, pushing, kicking, biting, pinching, holding or restraining, choking, or burning;
    2. Sexual Violence: forcing sex or specific sexual acts or behaviors or rape;
    3. Intimidation: breaking items, throwing things, or hurting animals;
    4. Threats and coercion: suicidal threats, threats of violence, threats to report the victim for misconduct or destroy their reputation and social connections, or coercion under threats to make the victim do things they normally would not and use those activities as further threats, threats against individual's family, friends, or children;
    5. Isolation: keeping victim away from friends and family, monitoring and/or limiting phone calls, texts, emails, Facebook or other forms of communication, monitoring interactions and activities throughout the day, not allowing participation in activities or hobbies, or using jealousy as an excuse for all of these behaviors;
    6. Emotional abuse: name calling, put downs in front of others, humiliating and degrading victim through words and behaviors, or requiring victim to look or dress a certain way;
    7. Minimizing, blaming and denying the controlling behavior and abuse: blaming the victim for the abusive behavior, defining the abusive behavior as loving behavior, or describing the abusive behavior as normal;
    8. Use of privilege: use of privilege and social roles to justify behavior, use status as a citizen, certain religious faith, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, economic situation, or other privilege of status to threaten, coerce or justify behavior;
    9. For same-sex partners: "outing" or the threat of "outing" can be a strong element of control.
    Domestic Violence

    Includes felony or misdemeanor crimes of violence committed by a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim, by a person with whom the victim shares a child in common, by a person who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse or intimate partner, by a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the State of Illinois, or by any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person's acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the State of Illinois.

    Stalking

    Knowingly and without justification follows or surveils another on at least 2 separate occasions and threatens or places in reasonable apprehension; stalking occurs when he or she knowingly engages in a course of conduct directed at a specific person and knows or should know that the conduct would cause a reasonable person to fear for their own safety or the safety of another person, or suffers emotional distress, defined as "significant mental suffering, anxiety or alarm. Stalking in conjunction with causing bodily harm, confining or restraining a person or violating court order or injunction is also prohibited.

    Examples of stalking include, but are not limited to (includes third-party contact):

    Stalking includes cyberstalking. Cyberstalking is to knowingly use electronic communication, including, without limitation, the creation and maintenance of an internet website or webpage for at least 24 hours which is accessible to one or more third parties, e-mail communication, and posting messages on a third party's internet website or webpage, to engage in any of the following conduct: 1) transmit a threat of immediate or future bodily harm, sexual assault, confinement or restraint to a specific person or a family member of that person; 2) place a specific person or a family member of that person in reasonable apprehension of immediate or future bodily harm, sexual assault, confinement or restraint; or 3) knowingly solicit a third party to transmit a threat of immediate or future bodily harm, sexual assault, confinement or restraint to a specific person or a family member of that person in violation of JJC's Title IX Policy and Procedure.

    1. Following, monitoring, observing, or surveilling a person;
    2. Appearing at a person's home, place of business, or classroom;
    3. Threatening or communicating to a person or about a person;
    4. Making harassing phone calls to a person;
    5. Mailing written messages, or sending electronic messages/photos;
    6. Leaving messages or objects at person's home, place of business, vehicle, or classroom; and/or
    7. Interfering with or damages personal property, including pets.
    Retaliation

    Any form of retaliation, including intimidation, threats, harassment and other adverse action taken or threatened against any complainant or person reporting or filing a complaint alleging sexual discrimination, harassment or misconduct or any person cooperating in the investigation of such allegations (including testifying, assisting or participating in any manner in an investigation) is strictly prohibited. Action is generally deemed adverse if it would deter a reasonable person in the same circumstances from opposing practices prohibited by the College's 2.2.6 Policy and Procedures. Retaliation may result in disciplinary or other action independent of the sanctions or interim measures imposed in response to the allegations of sexual discrimination, harassment or misconduct.

    Hostile Environment Caused by Sexual Harassment

    A sexually harassing hostile environment is created when conduct by an individual is so severe, pervasive or persistent that it denies or limits an individual's ability to participate in or receive the benefits, services or opportunities of the College's educational programs or activities or the individual's employment access, benefits or opportunities. In determining whether a hostile environment has been created, the conduct in question will be considered from both a subjective and an objective perspective of a reasonable person in the alleged victim's position, considering all the circumstances.

    Incapacitation

    When a person is incapable of giving consent due to the person's age, use of drugs or alcohol, or because an intellectual or other disability which prevents the person from having the capacity to give consent.

    Intimidation

    To make timid or fearful, to compel or deter by or as if by threats. Intimidation is a form of retaliation prohibited by the College's Sexual Discrimination, Harassment and Misconduct Policy and Procedures.

    Threat

    Any oral or written expression or gesture that could be interpreted by a reasonable person as conveying an intent to cause harm to persons or property.

    Consent

    Consent is clear, knowing and voluntary. Consent is active, not passive. Silence, in and of itself, cannot be interpreted as consent. Consent can be given by words or actions, as long as those words or actions create mutually understandable clear permission regarding willingness to engage in (and the conditions of) sexual contact/activity.

    1. Consent to any one form of sexual contact/activity cannot automatically imply consent to any other form of sexual activity.
    2. Previous relationships or prior consent cannot imply consent to future sexual acts.
    3. In order to give consent, one must be of legal age.
    4. Sexual contact/activity with someone who one should know to be or reasonably should have known to be mentally or physically incapacitated (by alcohol or other drugs, unconsciousness, sleep, or blackout), violate this policy.
    5. Consent may be withdrawn at any time.
    Force

    Force is the use of physical violence and/or imposing on someone physically to gain sexual access. Force also includes threats, intimidation (implied threats) and coercion that overcome resistance or produce consent.

    Coercion

    Coercion is unreasonable pressure for sexual activity. Coercive behavior differs from seductive behavior based on the type of pressure someone uses to get consent from another. When someone makes it clear to you that they do not want sex, that they want to stop, or that they do not want to go past a certain point of sexual interaction, continued pressure beyond that point can be coercive. This can include coercion by supervisory, instructional, or disciplinary authority.

     

    Facts

    Nine Fast Facts About Sexual Assault and Title IX
    1. Title IX prohibits sex discrimination in education programs that receive federal funding. (This means all public and charters K-12 schools, some private K-12 schools, and nearly all colleges and universities.)
    2. Sexual harassment, including sexual assault, is a type of sex discrimination that's banned by Title IX.
    3. Sexual assault = a physical act done against a person's will. This includes situations in which a person is incapable of giving consent due to drug or alcohol use.
    4. One in five women are victims of completed or attempted sexual assault while in college. That's over 2 million women.
    5. Sexual harassment creates a hostile environment when it is sufficiently serious that it interferes with or limits a student's ability to participate in or benefit from an educational program. (Rape is sufficiently severe to create a hostile environment.)
    6. If a school knows (or reasonably should know) about sexual harassment, including sexual assault, that creates a hostile environment, Title IX requires the school to take immediate action to eliminate the harassment, prevent its recurrence, and address its effects.
    7. Schools are required to adopt and publish grievance procedures for students who complain of sex discrimination, including sexual assault.
    8. If you file a complaint with the school, regardless of where the assault occurred, your school must process the complaint under grievance procedures.
    9. Because Title IX investigation is different from law enforcement investigation, even if you file a police report your school is independently required to investigate the assault. This investigation must be prompt, thorough, and impartial.

    Nine Fast Facts About Sexual Assault and Title IX provided by www.nwlc.org.

  • FAQs

    What Is sexual harassment?

    Sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination that violates Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

    Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature constitutes sexual harassment when submission to or rejection of this conduct explicitly or implicitly affects an individual's employment, unreasonably interferes with an individual's work performance or creates an intimidating, hostile or offensive work or academic environment.

    Sexual harassment can occur in a variety of circumstances, including but not limited to the following:

    • The victim as well as the harasser may be a woman or a man. The victim does not have to be of the opposite sex.
    • The harasser can be the victim's supervisor, an agent of the employer, a supervisor in another area, a co-worker, or a non-employee. A student can be harassed by teachers, other students, or anyone else with whom the student interacts while at school or while engaging in school-related activities.
    • The victim does not have to be the person harassed but could be anyone affected by the offensive conduct.
    • Unlawful sexual harassment may occur without economic injury to or discharge of the victim.
    • Such conduct has the purpose or effect of interfering with the individual's work or educational performance; of creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive working and/or learning environment; or of interfering with one's ability to participate in or benefit from an education program or activity.
    • The harasser's conduct must be unwelcome.

    Examples of Sexual Harassment

    • Pressure for sexual activity
    • Requests for sexual favors
    • Unwelcome patting, hugging or touching of a person's body, hair or clothing, intentionally brushing up against someone
    • Sexual innuendos, gestures, looks, jokes or comments
    • Disparaging remarks to a person about his or her gender or body; claiming that a person is gay or lesbian
    • Spreading sexual rumors about a person
    • Displaying or transmitting sexually suggestive electronic content, including emails and texts
    • Giving unwelcome personal gifts
    • Sexual assault

     

    What should I do if I am being sexually harassed?

    Sexual harassment which is ignored often escalates. It is helpful to directly inform the harasser that the conduct is unwelcome and must stop. Alert other people about the behavior. Doing this will provide you with support and can be important evidence later. Use any complaint mechanism or grievance system available and/or in place.

    Keep a detailed written record of the harassment. Record what happened, when, where, who else was present, and how you reacted. Save any notes, pictures, or other documents you receive from the harasser.

    Report the problem. Contact us to schedule an initial appointment to discuss your situation with us. We normally set aside an hour to speak with you. When you visit us, we will ask you to describe your situation and your view of what is going on, so that we can fully understand the situation. No one will force you to take any action you do not want to take.

     

    What should I do if I am assaulted?

    If the incident(s) involve sexual assault or rape, you are encouraged to immediately contact Campus Police at (815) 280-2234 or dial 911. You should go to the nearest emergency room and ask to be seen by a health care professional who specializes in examining sexual assault victims.

     

    What do I do to preserve evidence of sexual assault?

    For information on preserving evidence, please see the RAINN website regarding what to do in the aftermath of a sexual assault.

     

    What do I do if I believe a friend or myself have been harassed?

    If you experience, observe, hear about or believe someone has been sexually harassed in any way, you should make a report of the facts of the incident(s) in a timely manner by contacting the Title IX Deputy at 815-280-2309.

    JJC will not tolerate sexual harassment of its students or employees and will investigate all allegations of harassment. Reports will be investigated promptly. As stated above, please retain any notes, pictures, or other documents you receive from the harasser that may relate to the complaint. Where sexual harassment is found, steps will be taken to end it immediately.

     

    What if I'm not sure if my experience truly constitutes harassment?

    If you believe you may have experienced harassment or assault, but are unsure of whether it was a violation of JJC sexual harassment policy, you should contact the Title IX Deputy. It is imperative that all accounts of harassment are reported and investigated, in order to maintain the safety of the JJC community. The Title IX Deputy will help clearly define acts that constitute sexual misconduct, and provide information regarding options.

    What do I do if I am accused of sexual misconduct?

    Do not contact the alleged victim. If you have not already been contacted by the Title IX investigator, you may want to contact that office at 815-280-2309, who can explain the College's procedures for addressing sexual misconduct complaints. You may also want to talk confidentially to a counselor or seek other community assistance.

    You are advised to contact the Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities.

    Rights of a Student Responding to a Complaint of Sexual Discrimination, Harassment, and Misconduct

    Student respondents will receive written notification of their rights and have an opportunity to a verbal explanation as requested. These rights include, but are not limited to, the following:

    • To be treated with respect, dignity, sensitivity and professionalism throughout the process by college officials.
    • To protect privacy of student records to the extent allowed under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, 20 U.S.C. 1232g, 34 C.F.R. Part 99. The College will make all reasonable efforts to ensure preservation of privacy, restricting information to those with a legitimate need to know.
    • To have one advisor present during any meetings or hearings.
    • To have information on how the reporting and investigation process proceeds.
    • To receive a referral to private and confidential counseling.
    • A timely written notice of the charges.
    • Having information on how the reporting and investigation process will proceed, and to your rights through the process.
    • To have a Student Conduct Administrative or Conduct Board Hearing of Charges.
    • To have a closed, non-public hearing process.
    • To an adequate amount of time to prepare for the hearing. Participants shall be given at least three (3) calendar days' notice prior to the hearing except in rare circumstances.
    • To participate or decline to participate in the investigation or hearing panel process. However, the student conduct process will continue with the information available, and not participating in the investigation may preclude participation in the hearing panel or administrative hearing.
    • To refrain from making self-incriminating statements. However, the disciplinary process will continue with the information available.
    • Written information about the outcome and sanctions of any student conduct hearing.
    • For student disciplinary procedures, to have the right to an equal opportunity to present witnesses and other evidence in any hearing/investigation, and the right to the same appeal process as the complainant/victim.
    • With respect to student disciplinary procedures, notification will be simultaneous, and shall also address the right to file an appeal, if applicable. In accordance with federal and state privacy laws, the notification shall also address the sanction imposed against a student.
    • One level of appeal of the outcome or sanctions.

    Advisor/Advocate/Supporter:

    Both the student respondent and the victim and/or complainant are entitled to have an advisor present during any meetings regarding the process. The advisor's function is to provide support to the student. During meetings and hearings, the advisor may talk quietly with the student or pass notes in a non-disruptive manner. The advisor may not, in any way, intervene in the meeting/hearing or address the investigator/ hearing panel. The advisor cannot be someone who has a current formal role (e.g., academic advisor, coach, faculty member) with either the respondent or complainant.

  • Get Help

    Medical

    Joliet Junior College strongly encourages survivors of any form of violence to seek medical attention as soon as possible, even if they feel no injury was sustained. Medical providers can treat visible physical injuries, identify injuries that may not be visible, and, where appropriate, also test for and treat sexually transmitted infections, test for pregnancy, and provide emergency contraception (if requested). In addition, a hospital can test for the presence of alcohol or drugs (e.g. “date rape” drugs) and perform a rape evidence collection procedure, which can help maintain legal options.

    Presence St. Joseph Medical Center
    333 N Madison St.
    Joliet, IL 60435
    (815) 725-7133

    Silver Cross Hospital
    1900 Silver Cross Blvd.
    New Lenox, IL 60451
    (815) 300-1100

    Safety

    In thinking about current and long-term safety, you may want to consider developing a safety plan which could include ways to remain safe and possible ways to reduce risk of future harm. Information about safety planning can be found on the National Domestic Violence Hotline website.

    For assistance with safety planning, you can contact Joliet Junior College Police Department.

    Joliet Junior College Police Department
    Main Campus
    1215 Houbolt Rd, G-1013
    (815) 280-2234

    Local Law Enforcement Agencies

    City Center & Main Campus Jurisdiction   
    Joliet Police Department
    (815) 726-2491

    Romeoville Campus                                   
    Romeoville Police Department
    (815) 886-7219

    Weitendorf & Lincolnway Ed. Centers
    Will County Sheriff's Police Department
    (815) 727-8575

    Individual Rights

    • An individual who has experienced sexual misconduct has the right to choose whether to file a police report.
    • Reporting the incident to police does not mean that an individual is obligated to take the offender to court.
    • JJC officers receive special training in working with survivors of sexual assault and can guide survivors through the reporting process.
    • A survivor has up to five years after a sexual assault to make a report to the police and up to three years after an incident of domestic violence or stalking.
    • If you file a police report, the incident will be a matter of public record, but your name will not be used in connection with this record.

    Support

    If you need emotional support or guidance, you may choose to speak with one of the confidential resources. Confidential resources can provide survivors with information about support services and their options. Because of the confidential nature of these resources, disclosing information to or seeking advice from a confidential resource does not constitute a report or complaint to the University.

    Students may contact an off-campus rape crisis resource who can maintain confidentiality. A local resource is:

    Sexual Assault Service Center
    (815) 730-8984 (24hr. Hotline)

    Guardian Angel Community Services
    168 N. Ottawa St.
    Joliet, IL 60432
    (815) 729-0930
    Website: http://www.guardianangelhome.org

    Groundwork Domestic Violence Program
    168 N. Ottawa St., Joliet, IL 60432
    24-hour domestic violence hotline
    (815) 729-1228

    Counseling Services
    Master's Trained Counselors
    Counseling Office, A-1154
    Phone: (815) 280-2251
    (Please ask for personal and confidential counseling)

    Report

    Members of the JJC community who believe they have experienced sexual misconduct have the right to choose whether or not to report the incident to law enforcement and/or pursue a sexual misconduct complaint with the college. Information on reporting options can be found in the File a Complaint section

    Additional information about what happens after a report is made can be found in the College Policey section.

    Regardless of whether an individual decides to make a report, Northwestern strongly encourages individuals who have experienced sexual misconduct to preserve evidence to the greatest extent possible, as this will maintain all options for them in the future. More information can be found on our Preserving Evidence page.

    Other Help

    Interim protective measures and accommodations are reasonable measures the college can put in place to provide immediate support and added protection to an individual who has experienced sexual misconduct. Such measures include, but are not limited to:

    • No-contact directives
    • Housing or workplace relocation
    • Adjustment of course schedules or workplace schedules
    • Time off from class or work, or a leave of absence
    • Transportation arrangements

    Interim protective measures and accommodations can be made available regardless of whether an individual chooses to report an incident to the college or law enforcement, and come with no cost to the individual. JJC will keep confidential any accommodations or protective measures provided, to the extent that maintaining such confidentiality would not impair the ability of the institution to provide the protective measures or accommodations.

    Students seeking interim protective measures or accommodations should contact Dr. Yolanda Isaacs, Deputy Title IX Coordinator for sexual misconduct complaints against students: (815) 280-2309 or in A-3120, Deputy Title IX Coordinator, Dean of Students, Cynthia Vasquez-Barrios, (815) 280-2309 or in A-1100, Deputy Title IX Coordinator, or Judy Connelly, Interim Executive Director of Human Resource, (815) 280-2265 or A-3000 (Cases that involve employees).

  • Confidential Support

    The following resources are available for individuals to discuss incidents and issues related to sexual misconduct on a confidential basis. Confidential resources can provide survivors with information about support services and their options.

    Confidential resources will not disclose information about incidents of sexual misconduct to anyone, including law enforcement or the college, except in very limited situations, such as when failure to disclose the information would result in imminent danger to the individual or to others.

    Because of the confidential nature of these resources, disclosing information to or seeking advice from a confidential counselor does not constitute a report or complaint to the college and will not result in a response or intervention by the college.

    On-Campus Confidential Resources

    JJC Counseling Department
    Master's Trained Counselors
    Counseling Department, A-1154
    Phone: (815) 280-2251
    (Please ask for personal and confidential counseling)

    You may also choose to file an anonymous report by calling the JJC Sexual Misconduct and Dating/Domestic Violence Hotline at (815) 280-2888, available 24 hours a day or go to Harassment, Discrimination (Including Sexual Misconduct), and Retaliation On-Line Complaint Form where you can file an anonymous online report.

    Off-Campus Confidential Resources

    Sexual Assault Service Center
    (815) 730-8984 (24hr. Hotline)

    Guardian Angel Community Services
    168 N. Ottawa St.
    Joliet, IL 60432
    (815) 729-0930
    Website: http://www.guardianangelhome.org

    Groundwork Domestic Violence Program
    168 N. Ottawa St., Joliet, IL 60432
    24-hour domestic violence hotline
    (815) 729-1228      
    Groundwork Brochure
    Groundwork Brochure (Spanish)

    Presence St. Joseph Medical Center
    333 N Madison St.
    Joliet, IL 60435
    (815) 725-7133

    Silver Cross Hospital
    1900 Silver Cross Blvd.
    New Lenox, IL 60451
    (815) 300-1100

    RAINN created and operates the National Sexual Assault Hotline in partnership with more than 1,000 local sexual assault service providers across the country and operates the DoD Safe Helpline for the Department of Defense.

    Phone: 800.656.HOPE
    Online hotline: online.rainn.org
    Website: https://www.rainn.org/

    If you want to learn more about your rights, or if you believe that a school district, college, or university is violating Federal law, you may contact the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, at (800) 421-3481 or ocr@ed.gov.  If you wish to fill out a complaint form online, you may do so at: http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/complaintintro.html .

  • Title IX Coordinators

    Joliet Junior College has designated Title IX Coordinators and Deputy Coordinators who oversee the college’s compliance with Title IX. JJC's designated Title IX Coordinator and Deputy Coordinators oversee JJC’s compliance with Title IX, including coordinating the investigation of and response to sex discrimination complaints, responding to inquiries concerning Title IX, tracking incidents and trends involving sexual misconduct, coordinating equity in athletics compliance, publicizing JJC’s policies and providing training on preventing sex discrimination, sexual harassment, and sexual violence.

    If you have a complaint involving sex discrimination, sexual harassment, or sexual violence, or if you have questions about JJC’s policies or procedures in these areas, please contact one of the Title IX Coordinators or Deputy Coordinators listed below.

    Please Note: Title IX Coordinators and Deputy Coordinators are not a confidential source of support. While they will address your complaint with sensitivity and will keep your information as private as possible, confidentiality cannot be guaranteed. For confidential resources, please contact a Confidential Counselor.

    Title IX Coordinator

    Dr. Yolanda Isaacs
    Vice President of Student Development
    (815) 280-6690
    TitleIXcoordinator@jjc.edu
    A-3120

    Deputy Title IX Coordinator

    Cynthia Vasquez-Barrios
    Dean of Students
    (815) 280-2309
    cyvaque@jjc.edu

    A-1100

    Deputy Title IX Coordinator: Cases that involve employees

    Judy Connelly
    Interim Executive Director of Human Resource
    (815) 280-2265
    jconnell@jjc.edu
    A-3000

    Deputy Title IX Coordinator

    Kerri O'Shea
    Women's Athletics Coordinator
    (815) 280-2591
    koshea@jjc.edu

    Deputy Title IX Coordinator

    Dr. Mary Beth Luna
    Dean, Nursing, Health & Public Services
    (815) 280-2605
    mluna@jjc.edu

  • Help Someone Else

    If someone you know within the JJC community has experienced sexual misconduct, we can help you help them. Sometimes, the most valuable advice comes from someone the individual already trusts. Whether you’re a roommate, parent, or concerned member of our faculty or staff, we can point you to resources that you can share, as well as provide support for you through the process.

    1. Listen

    • Confirm the person’s safety. Ask the survivor, “Are you safe right now?” If they say no, help them create a plan to get to a safe place. Call 911 if necessary.
    • Provide nonjudgmental support. Your role is not to determine whether or not something occurred. Your primary responsibility is to remain supportive of the survivor, while referring the person those who are trained in providing assistance and/or intervening.

    2. Refer

    • Help the person get medical care if needed.
    • Help the person consider whether to make a report with the police or with the college. 
    • Direct the person to on-campus or off-campus confidential counseling and advocacy resources.
    • Let the person know who at JJC they can contact to request protective measures and accommodations such as no-contact directives, housing relocation, adjustment of schedules, time off, etc. 

    3. Report, as required

    All JJC employees, including student employees, are required to report incidents of sexual misconduct, unless they are confidential counselors.

    • If you are required to report the incident, explain your reporting responsibilities to the person who has disclosed the information to you.
    • If the incident involves alleged sexual misconduct by a faculty member, staff member, or a third party, contact the Deputy Coordinator, Judy Connelly at (815) 280-2265
    • If the incident involves alleged sexual misconduct by a student, contact the Deputy Title IX Coordinator for student matters, Cynthia Vasquez-Barrios at (815) 280-2309

    Do's and Don'ts

    While you are not expected to act as a counselor, when you are with someone who has experienced sexual misconduct, you should be aware that the supportiveness of your response can be critical in the healing process. Though there is no one “right” way to respond, the following may serve as a guide identifying more or less helpful responses:

    DO

    • Give the survivor your complete attention.
    • Validate the survivor’s feelings.
    • Tell the survivor:
      • “I believe you.”
      • “This was not your fault.”
      • “You have options.”
      • “Thank you for coming forward.”
    • Offer the survivor options:
      • To sit or stand.
      • To share more or be silent.
      • To call referral agencies or not, or to have you call.  
    • Ask the survivor what they need.
    • Remind the survivor that they are not alone, that other people of all genders have experienced sexual misconduct.
    • Provide the survivor with information about the resources available to them, including confidential counseling, medical resources and reporting resources.
    • Suggest to the survivor that they preserve evidence.
    • Follow up with the survivor.
    • Report the incident to the approproate Title IX Coordinator or Deputy if you are a college employee.
    • Take care of yourself after dealing with the situation. Get support for yourself if you need it. Consider speaking with a confidential counselor.

    DON'T

    • Tell the survivor that you know what they are going through.
    • Label the experience for the survivor or make any legal conclusions.
    • Minimize the survivor’s experience (e.g. that’s just how that person is.)
    • Tell the survivor what they should do or make decisions for them.
    • Ask the survivor questions that suggest they are to blame (e.g. What were you drinking? What were you wearing? Why didn’t you run? What were you doing in that place?)
    • Question whether the survivor is telling the truth or show doubt about their story.
    • Tell the survivor that they need some proof or evidence.
    • Touch the survivor’s leg, shoulder, hand, etc. unless they have explicitly told you that it is okay to do so.
    • Talk about your own issues or history.
    • Guarantee complete confidentiality, particularly if you are a college employee with a reporting obligation.
    • Panic. Take a deep breath and focus on listening to the survivor.

    8 Ways to Help a Sexual Assault Survivor

College Policy

Joliet Junior College is committed to maintaining an environment that is safe and free from discrimination, harassment and misconduct on the basis of sex, which includes sexual orientation or gender-related identity and has adopted these Procedures in conjunction with the Board Policy 2.01.01. The College prohibits sexual harassment, sexual assault, sexual misconduct, stalking and relationship/dating violence whether committed by a student against another student, a student against a staff member, or a staff member against a student. The purpose of this procedure is to implement Board Policy 2.01.01 to ensure a safe and healthy educational and employment environment, and meet legal requirements in accordance with: Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 ("Title IX"), which prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in the College's programs or activities; relevant sections of the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act; Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in employment; relevant sections of the Illinois Human Rights Act, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex or sexual orientation, including gender-related identity; and the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, 20 U.S.C. 1092(f) ("Clery Act"), which requires timely warning to the community of certain immediate threats. For purposes of this Procedure and corresponding Policy, the term "sexual discrimination, harassment and misconduct" will be used to refer to all of the violations covered by this document, including, without limitation, Sexual Harassment, Sexual Assault, Sexual Misconduct, Relationship and Dating Violence, and Stalking, unless there is a specific need to address a specific violation by name. A Title IX complaint includes complaints alleging sexual discrimination, sexual harassment and/or sexual misconduct which involve a College student as the victim and/or complainant or as the respondent. In an ongoing effort to address and reduce sexual discrimination, harassment and misconduct, the College provides education and prevention programs; investigates all complaints of sexual discrimination, harassment and misconduct; prohibits retaliation related to any complaint; dispenses corrective or disciplinary action where appropriate; provides information on obtaining appropriate counseling and medical care; and provides complainants with information on pursuing criminal or other legal action.

  • Policy on Sexual Misconduct

    Students who have been victims of and/or complainants of sexual discrimination, harassment or misconduct will receive an explanation of their rights in writing. These rights include, but are not limited to, the following:

    • To be treated with respect, dignity, sensitivity and professionalism throughout the process.
    • To protect privacy of student records to the extent allowed under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, 20 U.S.C. 1232g, 34 C.F.R. Part 99. The College will make all reasonable efforts to ensure preservation of privacy, restricting information to those with a legitimate need to know.
    • To have one advisor present during all meetings or hearings.
    • To have information on how the reporting and investigation process proceeds.
    • To receive a referral to private and confidential medical treatment/counseling.
    • To have knowledge of and access to all campus accommodations available, including assistance in changing academic situations.
    • To choose whether to participate in police or campus investigations and student conduct procedures.
    • To have safety issues addressed throughout the investigative and student processes including no requirement to participate in mediation.
    • To have the report promptly investigated, responded to and resolved, by campus officials within 60 days of the initial report. This does not apply to the on-going criminal investigation.
    • To have prior mental health, sexual past, or incidences of victimization excluded from a campus hearing.
    • To be exempt from charges of other lesser secondary violations of the Code of Conduct in making a report (i.e. violations of campus alcohol).
    • To have a closed, non-public hearing process.
    • To be notified when a report has been made by another party on one's behalf prior to any action being taken or the potential violator being notified.
    • To an adequate amount of time to prepare for the hearing. Participants shall be given at least three (3) calendar days' notice prior to the hearing except in rare circumstances.
    • To participate or decline to participate in the investigation or hearing process. However, the student conduct process will continue with the information available, and not participating in the investigation may preclude the College's ability to fully investigate.
    • To refrain from making self-incriminating statements. However, the disciplinary process will continue with the information available.
    • For student disciplinary procedures, to have the right to an equal opportunity to present witnesses and other evidence in any hearing/investigation, and the right to the same appeal process as provided to the respondent.
    • To be informed of the outcome and sanction(s) issued by any student conduct administrative or conduct board hearing.
    • With respect to student disciplinary procedures, notification will be simultaneous, and shall also address the right to file an appeal, if applicable. In accordance with federal and state privacy laws, the notification shall also address the sanction imposed against a respondent.
    • One level of appeal of the outcome or sanctions.

    Rights of a Student Responding to a Complaint of Sexual Discrimination, Harassment, and Misconduct

    Student respondents will receive written notification of their rights and have an opportunity to a verbal explanation as requested. These rights include, but are not limited to, the following:

    • To be treated with respect, dignity, sensitivity and professionalism throughout the process by college officials.
    • To protect privacy of student records to the extent allowed under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, 20 U.S.C. 1232g, 34 C.F.R. Part 99. The College will make all reasonable efforts to ensure preservation of privacy, restricting information to those with a legitimate need to know.
      • To have one advisor present during any meetings or hearings.
    • To have information on how the reporting and investigation process proceeds.
      • To receive a referral to private and confidential counseling.
    • A timely written notice of the changes.
      • Having information on how the reporting and investigation process will proceed, and to your rights through the process.
      • To have a Student Conduct Administrative or Conduct Board Hearing of Charges.
      • To have a closed, non-public hearing process.
    • To an adequate amount of time to prepare for the hearing. Participants shall be given at least three (3) calendar days' notice prior to the hearing except in rare circumstances.
      • To participate or decline to participate in the investigation or hearing panel process.   However, the student conduct process will continue with the information available, and not participating in the investigation may preclude participation in the hearing panel or administrative hearing.
      • To refrain from making self-incriminating statements. However, the disciplinary process will continue with the information available..
      • Written information about the outcome and sanctions of any student conduct hearing.
      • For student disciplinary procedures, to have the right to an equal opportunity to present witnesses and other evidence in any hearing/investigation, and the right to the same appeal process as the complainant/victim.
      • With respect to student disciplinary procedures, notification will be simultaneous, and shall also address the right to file an appeal, if applicable. In accordance with federal and state privacy laws, the notification shall also address the sanction imposed against a student.
      • One level of appeal of the outcome or sanctions.

  • Other Related Policies

    Jurisdiction

    This Procedure applies to students, faculty, staff, appointees, or third-parties, regardless of sexual orientation or gender-identity, whenever the misconduct occurs:

    • On College property; or

    • Off College property if:

      1. The conduct was in connection with a College or College-recognized program or activity; or
      2. The conduct may have the effect of creating a hostile environment for a member of the College community.

    Prohibited Acts

    Every member of the College community is prohibited from:

    • Engaging in sexual assault misconduct, violence, discrimination, stalking, or relationship violence;
    • Retaliating in any manner against an individual who reports an incident of sexual discrimination, harassment and misconduct;
    • Interfering with procedures to investigate or redress a complaint of an incident of sexual discrimination, harassment and misconduct;
    • Making an intentionally false accusation of an incident of sexual discrimination, harassment and misconduct through the College's procedures.

    Scope

    This Procedure governs sexual discrimination, harassment and/or misconduct involving:

    • A student victim and/or complainant and a student respondent;
    • A student victim and/or complainant and an employee or third-party respondent;
    • An employee victim and/or complainant and a student respondent; and
    • A third-party victim and/or complainant and a student respondent.

    Sexual discrimination, harassment and/or misconduct which solely involve employees and/or third-parties are not governed by this Procedure. For procedures governing sexual discrimination, harassment and/or misconduct which solely involve employees, please contact the Department of Human Resources.

    Notices of Non-Discrimination

    Inquiries concerning the application of the College's Board Policy 2.01.01 and this Procedure may be referred to one or all the following:

    • Title IX Coordinator, Yolanda Isaacs, Vice President of Student Development at (815)280-6690 or TitleIXcoordinator@jjc.edu
    • Deputy Title IX Coordinator, Cyndi Vasquez-Barrios, Dean of Students at (815) 280-2309 or cyvasque@jjc.edu
    • Deputy Title IX Coordinator, Judy Connelly, Interim Executive Director of Human Resources at (815) 280-2515 or jconnell@jjc.edu
    • Deputy Title IX Coordinator, Kerri O'Shea, Coordinator, Women's Athletics (815) 280-2591 or koshea@jjc.edu
    • Deputy Title IX Coordinator, Dr. Mary Beth Luna, Dean, Nursing, Health & Public Services (815) 280-2605 or mluna@jjc.edu

  • Complaint Resolution Process

    Joliet Junior College promptly and thoroughly investigates and resolves complaints alleging sex discrimination, sexual harassment, and sexual violence. 

    Formal Investigation

    Initiation of Investigation and Interim Measures: When a student accuses another student or employee of sexual discrimination, harassment or misconduct, and if reasonable grounds appear to exist, the Dean of Students Deputy Title IX Coordinator or designee will first determine if any interim measures are needed while the investigation proceeds. Interim measures may include, but are not limited to:

    • Imposing an interim suspension or interim removal from a class;
    • Issuing a no-contact order between the respondent and the complainant;
    • Providing an escort to ensure that the complainant can move safely between classes and activities;
    • Ensuring that the complainant and respondent do not attend the same classes; and
    • Arranging for the complainant to re-take a course or withdraw from a class without penalty, including ensuring that any changes do not adversely affect the complainant's academic record.

    When a student accuses an employee of a sexual discrimination, harassment or misconduct, the Human Resources Deputy Title IX Coordinator or her designee will conduct an investigation consistent with this procedure as well as applicable College personnel policies and collective bargaining agreements.

    For any type of complaint of sexual discrimination, harassment or misconduct, whether student-student, student-employee or employee-student, a two-person team will complete the investigation, which will be conducted as promptly and equitably as possible without compromising thoroughness. Absent extenuating circumstances, the college's investigation of a complaint will ordinarily be completed within 60 calendar days from the time a complaint is submitted. This time period may be shorter or longer depending on the circumstances including, but not limited to, the complexity of the case and the availability of witnesses. When a student accuses an employee of sexual discrimination, harassment or misconduct, the Human Resources Deputy Title IX Coordinator or his/her designee will be one of the members of the two-person team who will conduct an investigation consistent with this procedure as well as applicable College personnel policies and collective bargaining agreements. In such cases, the Human Resources Deputy Title IX Coordinator will regularly update the respondent on the status of the investigation and will update the complainant or victim in conjunction with Dean of Students Deputy Title IX Coordinator. When the respondent is not an employee, the Dean of Students Deputy Title IX Coordinator or the Title IX Coordinator will regularly update the complainant and respondent on the status of the investigation. In such cases, the investigation outcome will be presented to the Dean of Students Deputy Title IX Coordinator and/or the Title IX Coordinator and the Student Code of Conduct process will be followed.

    The College's investigative process is not a legal process and is not a substitute for making formal legal charges to the police. If civil suit and/or criminal charges are filed, the College reserves the right to conduct its own investigation and proceedings regardless of the status or resolution of any civil or criminal litigation.

    Notice to Respondent

    • Within 10 business days of receipt of a complaint, the respondent will be given written notice of the charges against him/her.
    • The respondent will be advised of the nature of the evidence against him/her unless release of the evidence would endanger the health or safety of victim(s) or witness(es) or the College community.

    Due Process Right of Victim and/or Complainant and Respondent

    • The victim and/or complainant and respondent will each be afforded the right to present information and witnesses relevant to his or her case.

    • When the student victim and/or complainant or respondent is requested to appear at an investigatory meeting or proceeding related to a complaint, he or she may be accompanied by an advisor. An advisor is defined as a family member, peer, or staff/faculty member of the College; it does not include legal counsel or an attorney at law. The advisor may not, in any way, intervene in the meeting/hearing or address the investigator/ hearing panel. The advisor cannot be someone who has a current formal role (e.g., academic advisor, coach, faculty member) with either the respondent or complainant.  The advisor's function is to provide support to the student. During meetings and hearings, the advisor may talk quietly with the student or pass notes in a non-disruptive manner.
    • If the respondent is a College employee, then any employee misconduct investigation procedures outlined in applicable employee guidebooks and/or collective bargaining agreements will apply.

    Evidence Considered

    Investigators will interview and receive evidence from the victim, complainant, respondent and any witnesses identified during the course of the investigation. The victim’s prior sexual history will not be considered during the investigation or any proceeding related to a complaint.

    Preservation of Evidence

    Any physical evidence gathered by the investigator will be preserved by the JJC police.

    Report of Investigation

    At the conclusion of the investigation, the investigator will prepare a thorough report outlining the: complaint, investigation conducted and all relevant evidence obtained; investigator's conclusions with an explanation of reasoning and/or support for such conclusions; and recommendations for sanctions or other remedial action as appropriate. The investigator will submit his/her report to the Title IX Coordinator, Department of Human Resources Deputy Title IX Coordinator, and/or Dean of Students Deputy Title IX Coordinator, as appropriate.

    Determination Based Upon Preponderance of the Evidence

    For student respondent cases, the Dean of Students Deputy Title IX Coordinator in conjunction with the Title IX Coordinator shall review the investigator's report and all evidence gathered to determine whether the student respondent engaged in sexual discrimination, harassment and/or misconduct in violation of College policy. For employee respondent cases, the Department of Human Resources Deputy Title IX Coordinator in conjunction with the Title IX Coordinator shall review the investigator's report and all evidence gathered to determine whether the employee respondent engaged in sexual discrimination, harassment and/or misconduct in violation of College policy.  The determination of violations shall be made based on the preponderance of evidence, meaning whether it is more likely than not that this policy was violated.

    Notice to Respondent

    For student respondents, within 10 business days after receipt of the investigator's report, the Title IX Coordinator or the Dean of Students Deputy Title IX Coordinator will notify the student respondent via certified mail, return receipt requested, of his/her determination. If the Title IX Coordinator or the Dean of Students Title IX Coordinator determines that the student respondent has violated the College's prohibition of sexual discrimination, harassment and/or misconduct, this notification will also advise the student respondent of:

    • Disciplinary sanctions; and
    • The right to appeal the determination and sanctions in accordance with the appeal procedures set forth in Section XVII- XIX, of the Title IX procedures.

    For employee respondents, the Department of Human Resources will follow its obligation under College Policies and Collective Bargaining Agreements in providing employees with notice of the College's determination. If the Title IX Coordinator or Department of Human Resources Deputy Title IX Coordinator determines the employee respondent has engaged in sexual misconduct, discrimination or harassment, then the College shall notify said respondent of disciplinary sanctions and his or her right to appeal.  The Title IX Coordinator and all involved Deputy Title IX Coordinators shall be copied on all College correspondences and notices to the respondent.

    Notice to Victim and/or Complainant

    Concurrently with the notice provided to respondent, the Title IX Coordinator will notify the victim and/or complainant via certified mail, return receipt requested, of his/her determination. If the Title IX Coordinator determines that the respondent has violated the College's prohibition of sexual discrimination, harassment and/or misconduct, this notification will also advise the victim and/or complainant of:

    • Any individual remedies offered or provided to the victim and/or complainant;
    • Disciplinary sanctions imposed on the respondent that directly relate to the victim and/or complainant;
    • In sexual violence cases only, any disciplinary sanctions imposed on the respondent;
    • The right to appeal the determination and sanctions in accordance with the Appeal Procedures set forth in Section XVII- XIX, below; and
    • If the College determines that a hostile environment exists, it will inform the victim and/or complainant of steps it has taken to eliminate the hostile environment and to prevent recurrence. 
    • The Title IX Coordinator and all involved Title IX Coordinators shall be copied on all College correspondences and notices to the victim. 

    Concurrent Criminal Investigation

    The existence of a concurrent criminal investigation by law enforcement agencies will not necessarily delay or interrupt the investigation procedures outlined herein.  However, the law enforcement agency may request that the College investigation be temporarily suspended. In such cases, the College will evaluate the law enforcement agency's request to determine whether and for how long to suspend its investigation. It is understood that during an ongoing criminal investigation, information relevant to the pending case or prosecution may not be permitted to be shared with the College until the criminal investigation is closed.  Regardless whether authorities criminally prosecute students or employees for engaging in any acts prohibited by this Procedure or Board Policy 2.01.01. JJC students or employees who violate this Procedure or Board Policy 2.01.01. re subject to discipline by JJC.

    Review the entire procedure by clicking the (PDF) link below:

    Title IX Procedure

  • File a Report

    The College encourages student victims of sexual discrimination, harassment and/or misconduct, including sexual violence, to talk to somebody about what happened so that victims can get the support they need and so that the College can respond appropriately. Victims and/or complainants are encouraged to file a complaint identifying the accused individual and describing the conduct, incident(s) or occurrence(s) that form the basis for the claim. The victim and/or complainant are encouraged to file the complaint as soon as possible after the incident to ensure a prompt and effective remedy. It is preferred that the complaint be in writing, signed by the student and include the contact information for the complainant. However, the College will process the complaint regardless of whether it is in writing.

    Different employees on campus have different abilities to maintain a student victim's confidentiality:

    • Some employees are required to maintain near complete confidentiality.
    • Some employees may talk to a student victim in confidence and generally only report to the College that an incident occurred without revealing any personally identifying information.
    • Some employees are required to report all the details of an incident (including identities of the student victim and alleged perpetrator) to the Title IX Coordinator. A report to these employees, called "Responsible Employees", constitutes a report to the College and generally obligates the College to investigate the incident and take appropriate steps to address the situation.

    Professional Counselors

    Professional, licensed counselors who provide counseling to students are not required to report any information about an incident to the Title IX Coordinator without a student victim’s permission.

    Reporting to "Responsible Employees"

    Responsible Employee about an incident of sexual discrimination, harassment or misconduct, the student victim has the right to expect the College to take immediate and appropriate steps to investigate what happened and to resolve the matter promptly and equitably.

    A Responsible Employee must report to the Title IX Coordinator(s) all relevant details about the alleged sexual violence shared by the student victim and that the College will need to determine what happened – including the names of the student victim and alleged perpetrator(s), any witnesses, and any other relevant facts, including the date, time and specific location of the alleged incident.

    To the extent possible, information reported to a Responsible Employee will be shared only with people responsible for handling the College's response to the report.

    The following categories of employees are the College's Responsible Employees:

    1. College Administrators (excluding mental health counselors)
    2. Title IX Coordinator and Deputy Title IX Coordinators
    3. Deans and higher-level administrators
    4. Directors, Coordinators, Managers
    5. Faculty Department Chairs
    6. Academic Advisors
    7. Faculty (that advise a student club or organization)
    8. Student Development Staff (except clerical)
    9. Student Employee Supervisors
    10. Campus Police and Staff
    11. Athletics Staff
    12. Student Activities Staff
    13. Human Resources Staff
    14. Anyone given the authority by the Title IX Coordinator

    Before a student victim reveals any information to Responsible Employee, the employee should ensure that the student victim understands the employee's reporting obligations – and, if the student victim wants to maintain confidentiality, direct the student victim to the confidential resources listed above.

    If the student victim wants to tell the Responsible Employee what happened but also maintain confidentiality, the employee should tell the student victim that the College will consider the request, but cannot guarantee that the College will be able to honor it. In reporting the details of the incident to the Title IX Coordinator, the Responsible Employee will also inform the Title IX Coordinator of the student victim's request for confidentiality.

    Student Requesting Confidentiality from the College: How the College Will Weigh the Request and Respond

    If a student victim discloses an incident to a Responsible Employee but wishes to maintain confidentiality or requests that no investigation into a particular incident be conducted or disciplinary action taken, the College must weigh that request against the College's obligation to provide a safe, non-discriminatory environment for all students and employees, including the student victim.

    If the College honors the request for confidentiality, a student victim must understand that the College's ability to meaningfully investigate the incident and pursue disciplinary action against the alleged perpetrator(s) may be diminished.

    Although rare, there are times when the College may not be able to honor a student victim's request in order to provide a safe, non-discriminatory environment for all students and employees.

    The College has designated the following individual(s) to evaluate requests for confidentiality:

    • Title IX Coordinator
    • Deputy Title IX Coordinators

    When weighing a student victim's request for confidentiality or that no investigation or discipline be pursued, a range of factors will be considered, including the following:

    1. The increased risk that the alleged perpetrator(s) will commit additional acts of sexual discrimination, harassment or misconduct, such as:
    2. Whether there have been other sexual discrimination complaints about the same alleged perpetrator;
    3. Whether the alleged perpetrator has a history of arrests or records from a prior school indicating a history of misconduct or violence;
    4. Whether the alleged perpetrator threatened further sexual discrimination or violence against the student victim or others;
    5. Whether the sexual discrimination was committed by multiple perpetrators;
    6. Whether the sexual discrimination, harassment or misconduct was perpetrated with a weapon;
    7. Whether the student victim is a minor;
    8. Whether the College possesses other means to obtain relevant evidence of the sexual discrimination, harassment or misconduct (e.g., security cameras or physical evidence); and
    9. Whether the student victim's report reveals a pattern of perpetration (e.g., via illicit use of drugs or alcohol) at a given location or by a particular group.

    The presence of one or more of these factors could lead the College to investigate and, if appropriate, pursue disciplinary action. If none of these factors is present, the College will likely respect the student victim's request for confidentiality.

    If the College determines that it cannot maintain a student victim's confidentiality, the College will inform the student victim at the earliest point possible and will, to the extent possible, only share information with people responsible for handling the College's response. The College will also take immediate action as necessary to protect and assist the student victim.

    If the College determines that it can respect a student victim's request for confidentiality, the College will also take immediate action as necessary to protect and assist the student victim.

    If a victim's request for confidentiality limits the College's ability to formally investigate a particular allegation, the College may take steps to limit the effects of the alleged sexual discrimination, harassment and/or misconduct and prevent its recurrence without initiating formal action against the alleged perpetrator or revealing the identity of the student complainant. Such action may include, but is not limited to:

    1. Providing increased monitoring, supervision, or security at locations or activities where the alleged misconduct occurred;
    2. Providing training and education materials for students and employees;
    3. Revising and publicizing the College's policies regarding sexual discrimination, harassment and misconduct; and
    4. Conducting climate surveys regarding sexual misconduct.

  • Reporting to Police

    Reports of crimes may be filed with law enforcement with or without the assistance or notifying the Title IX coordinators. The College will assist any student with filing a report with campus police or law enforcement agency. The Title IX Coordinator or Deputy Coordinator(s) will report complaints of sexual violence to campus police or the appropriate law enforcement agency when requested to do so by complainant. As required by law, reports shall be made to law enforcement and Department of Children and Family Services when the victim is a minor.

    The Title IX Coordinator or Deputy Coordinator, in consultation with campus police and other appropriate campus officials, shall analyze each report of sexual violence to determine if a health or safety emergency as defined by state and federal law warrants disclosure of information relating to the complaint. In such case, information relating to the complaint will be disclosed to the appropriate persons including campus police or appropriate law enforcement personnel.

    Timely warnings or emergency notifications issued by campus police under the Clery Act related to sexual violence shall also be sent to appropriate law enforcement agencies when deemed necessary.

    Joliet Junior College encourages individuals to report incidents of sexual misconduct to University Police or local police. Timely reporting to the police is an important factor in successful investigation and prosecution of crimes, including sexual violence crimes, and may lead to the arrest of an offender or aid in the investigation of other incidents.

    An individual who has experienced sexual misconduct has the right to choose whether to file a police report.  Filing a police report can result in the investigation of whether sexual violence or related crimes occurred and the prosecution of those crimes against a perpetrator. Reporting the incident to police or College Police does not mean an individual is obligated to testify in court.

    The Joliet Junior College Police Department has officers who are specially trained to work with individuals reporting sexual violence.  Further, College Police has a written guarantee fir sexual violence survivors that reflects its primary concern for survivors and emphasizes sensitivity and privacy. College Police can also assist in reviewing options with survivors and identifying and facilitating support resources related to:  

    • Seeking medical attention
    • Seeking support, advocacy and counseling services
    • Discussing legal options, including seeking protective orders from a court
    • Options under the college’s sexual misconduct investigation process

    Reports of sexual misconduct made to College Police will automatically be reported to the Title IX Coordinator or a Deputy Title IX Coordinator regardless of whether the individual who experienced the sexual misconduct chooses to pursue criminal charges. 

    Joliet Junior College Police Department

    Main Campus
    1215 Houbolt Rd, G-1013
    (815) 280-2234

    City Center & Main Campus Jurisdiction

    Joliet Police Department
    (815) 726-2491

    Romeoville Campus

    Romeoville Police Department
    (815) 886-7219

    Weitendorf & Lincolnway Ed. Centers

    Will County Sheriff's Police Department
    (815) 727-8575

    Morris Education Center

    Morris Police Department
    (815) 942-2131

  • Reporting to the College

    Joliet Junior College has designated the Title IX Coordinator to oversee complaints of sexual misconduct at the college. An individual who has experienced sexual misconduct has the right to choose whether to report the incident to Title IX Coordinators and Deputy Coordinators for investigation. The Title IX Coordinator and Deputy Title IX Coordinators are specially trained to work with individuals who report sexual misconduct and have knowledge about on- and off-campus resources, services, and options – including the availability of interim protective measures and accommodations.

    All college employees (including student employees) are obligated to report incidents of sexual misconduct of which they become aware, unless they have a recognized confidentiality privilege.

    Please call or email one of JJC’s Title IX Coordinators to set up a meeting if you have a complaint involving sexual misconduct. You can also call for general information.

    Please Note: Title IX Coordinators are not a confidential source of support. While they will address your complaint with sensitivity and will keep your information as private as possible, confidentiality cannot be guaranteed. For confidential resources, please contact Counseling Services (Master's Trained Counselors) at (815) 280-2251 or A-1154.

    Electronic and Anonymous Reporting

    You may also file a complaint about sexual misconduct using the appropriate links below. While anonymous complaints are accepted, the college’s ability to investigate and respond to anonymous complaints is limited.

    To File a Report Electronically:

    Individuals may use this form to electronically file a report of sexual misconduct: Harassment, Discrimination (Including Sexual Misconduct), and Retaliation On-Line Complaint Form.

  • Preserving Evidence

    Regardless of whether an incident of sexual misconduct is reported to the police or the college, Joliet Junior College strongly encourages individuals who have experienced sexual misconduct to preserve evidence to the greatest extent possible, as this will best maintain all legal options for them in the future.

    Below are suggestions for preserving evidence related to an incident of sexual misconduct. It is important to keep in mind that each suggestion may not apply in every incident:

    General Suggestions

    • Do not alter, dispose of, or destroy any physical evidence.
    • If there is suspicion that a drink may have been drugged, inform a medical assistance provider and/or law enforcement as soon as possible so they can attempt to collect possible evidence (e.g., from the drink, through urine or blood sample).
    • Preserve evidence of electronic communications by saving them and/or by taking screen shots of text messages, instant messages, social networking pages, or other electronic communications, and by keeping pictures, logs, or copies of documents that relate to the incident and/or perpetrator.
    • Even if survivors choose not to make a complaint regarding sexual misconduct, they should nevertheless consider speaking with University Police or other law enforcement to preserve evidence in the event that they change their mind at a later date.

    Suggestions Specific to Sexual Assault

    • Because some evidence, particularly evidence that may be located on the body, dissipates quickly (within 48-96 hours), individuals who have been sexually assaulted and wish to preserve evidence should go to a hospital or medical facility immediately to seek a medical examination and/or evidence collection. Under Illinois law, any cost for an emergency medical or forensic examination for a victim of sexual violence that is not covered by private insurance or Illinois Public Aid will be covered by the Illinois Department of Healthcare and Family Services, and should not be billed to the patient.
    • An individual who has been sexually assaulted should not shower, bathe, douche, smoke, brush teeth, eat, drink, or change clothes or bedding before going to the hospital or seeking medical attention.
    • If the individual who has been sexually assaulted decides to change clothes or bedding, they should not wash the clothes worn or bedding used during the assault, and should bring them to a hospital, medical facility or the police in a non-plastic bag (e.g., paper bag).
    • In Illinois, individuals who have been sexually assaulted may allow the collection of evidence even if they choose not to make a report to law enforcement. After the evidence is collected, Illinois law requires hospital staff to store it for two weeks. A sexual assault evidence collection kit may not be released by an Illinois hospital without written consent from the survivor.

  • Report FAQs

    What if other students discover I've filed a report?

    Students who, in good faith, report what they believe to be sexual harassment, or who cooperate in any investigation, will not be subjected to retaliation. Any student who believes he or she has been the victim of retaliation for reporting sexual harassment or cooperating in an investigation should immediately contact the Title IX Coordinator.

    What if I want to report something, but I know I broke a rule under the JJC Student Code of Conduct?

    JJC encourages the reporting of harassment whenever it occurs. Sometimes, victims are hesitant to report to College officials because they fear that they may be charged with policy violations, such as underage drinking at the time of the incident.

    Will the complaint remain confidential?

    Before reporting, it is important to know that different people on campus have different reporting responsibilities and different abilities to maintain confidentiality, depending on their roles. We encourage you to contact the Title IX Coordinator because he/she is best equipped to help. Please rest assured that if you contact the Title IX Coordinator only people that need to know will be told.

    Will my parents be told?

    No, not unless you tell them. Whether you are the complainant or the accused, the College's primary relationship is to the student and not to the parent. However, in the event of major medical, disciplinary, or academic jeopardy, students are strongly encouraged to inform their parents. College officials will directly inform parents when requested to do so by the student. The College also reserves the right to inform parents where permitted by FERPA, including in a life threatening situation.

    Do I have to name the perpetrator?

    While you are not required to name the perpetrator, the College still has an obligation to investigate. Without the name of the accused, the College is limited in its ability to respond to allegations, offer remedies for the complainant, and to sanction the accused. Sometimes victims are hesitant to report for fear of retaliation. JJC vigorously enforces a policy of no retaliation.

    Filing a Report

    If you have experienced any form of sexual harassment or assault, please contact the Title IX Coordinator or Deputy Coordinators to report the incident:

    Dr. Yolanda Isaacs, Vice President, Student Development
    Title IX Coordinator
    A-3121
    815-280-6691
    yisaacs@jjc.edu

    Cynthia Vasquez-Barrios
    Dean of Students
    Title IX Deputy Coordinator
    A-1103
    815-280-2309
    cyvasque@jjc.edu

    Judith Connelly
    Interim Executive Director, Human Resources
    Title IX Deputy Coordinator
    A-3010
    815-280-2265
    jconnell@jjc.edu

    Campus Police can also assist you filing criminal charges.

    If you choose, you may file an anonymous report by calling the JJC Whistleblower Hotline at 815-280-6800, available 24 hours a day. Please see Board Policy 2.2.5 for additional information.

    Information for supervisors, managers, administrators, faculty and any other people who are responsible for others.

    Guidelines for Handling Harassment, Sexual Harassment or Discrimination

    While it is important to respect the privacy of the individuals involved, it may not be possible to keep certain information confidential if a situation is serious enough to warrant further action. As a representative of Joliet Junior College, once a supervisor, faculty member or administrator becomes aware of a situation, the College is legally considered to be aware of it as well, and is "on notice". It should be explained to the parties, however, that information will be shared, if at all, only on a need-to-know basis.

    It may be possible to withhold the name of the complainant from the respondent. If the respondent is told of the complaint, however, he or she will need to be given enough information to be able to understand what conduct is being complained of. While the respondent may be able to guess who has complained, it is actually worse for the respondent to have too little information.

    1. Thank the person for coming to you, and let him or her know that you take the matter seriously.

    2. Provide the person with information about Board Policy 2.01.01 and contact information for the Title IX Coordinator. Be sure to let him or her know where to pursue a formal complaint, even if the person says he or she does not wish to do so. You can tell the person that you're neither encouraging nor discouraging a formal complaint, but that you just want the person to have the information.

    3. Explain that you will keep the matter private, but do not promise confidentiality, even if the person requests it. Tell the person that if any information needs to be shared, it will be on a need-to-know basis only. Be sure to respect that promise.

    4. Promptly contact the Title IX Coordinator and discuss the matter, even if the next step seems obvious.

      The Title IX Coordinator should be contacted immediately with harassment and discrimination concerns, even those that may seem trivial. In order to help ensure consistent handling of harassment and discrimination matters throughout the College, this office will conduct the investigation in those situations where doing so is necessary.

      Do not offer any comments, guesses or opinions about possible outcomes.

      Do not offer any comments, guesses or opinions about the respondent (person complained of).

      We ask that supervisors, managers, administrators, faculty, and other people who are responsible for others err on the side of safety and caution, and contact us to discuss the situation even if they are not sure whether a situation is really harassment or discrimination. For more information, contact the Title IX Coordinator. If at all possible, people who are handling these situations should use the phone or schedule a meeting person. It is best to avoid discussing confidential and or sensitive matters by email.

    5. Doing nothing is always the wrong thing, and time is of the essence

      All harassment and discrimination concerns must be addressed promptly, without waiting for a formal or written complaint. This does not mean handling all incidents at the same level, or overreacting to minor problems, but dealing with problems effectively and appropriately. The Title IX Coordinator should be contacted regarding what to do.

    6. Treat all complaints seriously

      Treat all complaints seriously, no matter how improbable or trivial an allegation may seem to be, or what motivation may have seem to have prompted the claim. It is a major error to assume that a complaint has no merit or is unimportant, and fail to do anything about it. The Title IX Coordinator is available to help determine what response is necessary for any given situation and what disposition is consistent with College practice.

      When someone reveals a concern, it is important not to judge the person's credibility or question the appropriateness of his or her actions. This is not the time for conjecture about whether the person is telling the truth, or whether he or she might have prevented the behavior in question. In addition, we prefer that supervisors avoid offering an opinion about whether the policy has been violated, even if it seems obvious that the behavior is or is not harassment.

    7. Be aware that the complainant's requests do not control how a case is handled

      While it is important to know what the complainant wants to happen, and his or her requests are always taken into account, those preferences do not determine how the case will be handled. He or she may want the College to do more—or less—than what is ultimately determined to be appropriate for the circumstances. If a matter is serious enough, the College is obliged to address the situation even if the complainant directs us not do so. For example, a complainant may ask that "nothing be done," but if doing so allows harassment to continue, or if the behavior is egregious, we cannot accommodate that request. On the other hand, a complainant will sometimes demand that the respondent be fired or severely disciplined for conduct that the College does not believe warrants that level of corrective action; it is the Title IX Coordinator's judgment that determines the outcome, even if the complainant is not happy with the result.

    8. Guard against retaliation

      Assure the complainant that retaliation is prohibited under the policy and warn the respondent of this same principle. Determine whether the complainant has any concerns that there will be negative consequences for disclosing the complaint, and ask him or her to inform you if retaliation occurs.

      Make clear to the respondent the prohibition against retaliation. He or she should also be made aware that attempts to determine who had complained, or to contact the complainant to apologize, explain, or discuss the allegations could be viewed as retaliatory as well. If interaction between the parties is necessary, discussion should be limited to work-related matters.

      Neither party should be penalized or discouraged from using any of the resources available to them.

    9. Actively protect the safety and well-being of both parties

      As a rule, parties on all sides experience great distress in harassment matters. It is advisable routinely to provide both parties with information about JJC support services, including counseling services and other services that may be needed.

      If the situation might involve a criminal matter such as an assault or a hate crime, be sure to advise either party that he or she has a right to contact Campus Police or the local police agencies. In addition, take the initiative to speak to Campus Police and/or Human Resources if safety might be an issue.

      Consult with Human Resources about the appropriateness of using measures such as annual leave or paid suspension (for employees) for either or both parties if doing so might be indicated.

    10. Carefully document all actions and communications. Keep detailed documentation, taking careful notes about communications and other events.

    11. Corrective action must be appropriate

    After Human Resources has been consulted, any steps taken to correct the situation should be at the lowest level appropriate to the circumstances. Decisions about disciplinary action should be made in consultation with Human Resources.

    The possible range of resolutions is broad, and includes actions such as:

    • Coaching/support of subordinates in addressing the behavior themselves;
    • General education or training;
    • Mediation, if appropriate;
    • Reprimand;
    • Discipline, up to and including termination.

    Faculty, student affairs personnel, athletics personnel, and other responsible employees have a particular responsibility for addressing sexual harassment and sexual assault of students. Any faculty member or responsible employee who becomes aware of possible sexual harassment or sexual assault of a student must promptly contact the Title IX Coordinator. Possible crimes should immediately be reported to Campus Police. Anyone who may have experienced sexual assault should be provided with information about support and advocacy services.

    For more information, see the following materials:

    • US Department of Education "Dear Colleague Letter" of April 2011
    • Schools' Obligations to Respond to Sexual Harassment and Sexual Violence
    • U.S. Department of Education Revised Sexual Harassment Guidance of 2001
    • Harassment of Students by School Employees, Other Students or Third Parties

    Notice

    Title IX Coordinator

    Pursuant to Public Law 92-318, notice is hereby given that the Title IX Coordinator for Joliet Junior College, District No. 525 and the contact information for the Title IX Coordinator is:

    Dr. Yolanda Isaacs, Vice President, Student Development
    Title Coordinator
    c/o Joliet Junior College, District No. 525

    Mailing Address: 1215 Houbolt Rd.
    A-3121
    Joliet, IL 60431
    Telephone Number: 815-280-6691
    Fax: 815-729-3331
    Email: yisaacs@jjc.edu

    Inquiries, complaints and information regarding Title IX should be directed to the Title IX Coordinator at the address, email or phone number listed above.