Michael Thune
English & World Languages
Department Chair
Office: C-1049
Phone: (815) 280-6663
Email: mthune@jjc.edu

JoAn Pollack Ayorinde
English & World Languages
Department Secretary
Office: C-1050
Phone: (815) 280-6633
Fax: (815) 280-6730
Email: jpollack@jjc.edu

World Languages Courses 

Eifel Tower in Paris, France 

Visit our blog as a group of our faculty are getting ready to go to China as part of an international activity sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education via a Title VIA Grant.

World language courses stress oral communication and include emphasis on understanding the cultures of the specific target language. Students enrolling in transfer courses must demonstrate basic proficiency in English by successfully completing the COMPASS placement test. Students with world language credit from high school may wish to test out of the beginning French or Spanish courses. Please contact Cristobal Trillo (Spanish and French), or Roxanne Munch (Chair of the English/World Languages department).

Several organizations support the study of and excellence in world languages. Sigma Delta Mu is the national honor society for Hispanic studies for two-year colleges. It recognizes students who attain excellence in the study of Spanish and in the knowledge of the literature and culture of Spanish-speaking people. Alpha Mu Gamma is a society whose goals are:

  1. To recognize achievement in the field of world-language study
  2. To stimulate a desire for linguistic attainment
  3. To encourage a continuing interest in the study of world languages, literature, and civilizations
  4. To foster sympathetic understanding of other people and international friendship

World Languages Intercultural Club (FLIC) is devoted to instilling an awareness of different cultures by providing an active and social outlet for students interested in international culture and languages.

Courses

French 101
This course is offered for those who have had no French or who have had one year of high school French. Emphasis is on the acquisition of the four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) through practical and realistic everyday situations meaningful to beginning students. Students are also introduced to cultures and traditions of French-speaking countries.

French 102
This course is a continuation of French 101. Students are introduced to all of the basic structures of the French language. Emphasis is on increasing students' ability to communicate in basic survival situations and on understanding cultures and traditions of French-speaking countries.

French 103
This course is a thorough review of French grammar and structure, with continued development of audio-lingual skills. Students become increasingly proficient at expressing their thoughts, feelings, and opinions on a variety of matters. The students' knowledge of French literature, cultures, and traditions is enhanced through reading representative French literature selections.

French 104
This course is a continuation of French 103. Students develop a degree of proficiency in the language in a coordinated linguistic, thematic, and cultural approach. Reading selections develop an appreciation of French peoples, cultures, and traditions.

French 105
Intensive practice in oral and written French develops mastery of all grammatical structures. Reading selections from French newspapers, periodicals, and taped materials, as well as written assignments emphasize historical and contemporary aspects of French cultures.

French 106
This course is a continuation of French 105.

Language 107
This is a language practicum course designed to provide students who have successfully completed their first year of world language the opportunity to work as a tutor and class assistant with first-year world language students. Students may earn up to three hours of credit over three semesters.

Spanish 101
This course is offered for those who have had no Spanish or have had one year of high school Spanish. The emphasis is on the development of the four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) in practical and realistic everyday situations meaningful to beginning students. Students are also introduced to Hispanic cultures and traditions.

Spanish 102
This course is a continuation of Spanish 101. Students are introduced to all the basic structures of the Spanish language. Emphasis is on increasing students' ability to communicate in basic survival situations and on understanding Hispanic cultures and traditions.

Spanish 103
This course is a thorough review of Spanish grammar and structure, with continued development of audio-lingual skills. Students become increasingly proficient at expressing their thoughts, feelings, and opinions on a variety of matters. The students' knowledge of Hispanic literature, cultures, and traditions is enhanced through reading representative Hispanic literature selections.

Spanish 104
This course is a continuation of Spanish 103. Students develop a degree of proficiency in the language in a coordinated linguistic, thematic, and cultural approach. Reading selections develop an appreciation of Hispanic peoples, cultures, and traditions.

Spanish 105
Intensive practice in oral and written Spanish develops mastery of all grammatical structures. Reading selections from Hispanic newspapers, periodicals, and taped materials, as well as written assignments emphasize historical and contemporary aspects of Hispanic cultures.

Spanish 106
This course is a continuation of Spanish 105.

Spanish 120
Basic Occupational Spanish will give participants the opportunity to develop basic, oral communication skills for interaction in Spanish in a business setting. Skills covered will include: pronunciation rules; alphabet and numbers; and basic verbs, nouns, adjectives, and interrogatives.

Spanish 121
Spanish for Landscaping Personnel will train participants to communicate effectively with Spanish-speaking personnel in landscaping situations. Skills will include informal conversations, identifying equipment, "how-to" directions, basic commands, stating job needs, telephone conversations, resolving disagreements, and discussing other workplace issues. Job site observations and note-taking will be important components of this course.

Spanish 122
Spanish for Hospitality Personnel will train participants to communicate effectively with Spanish-speaking personnel in hospitality situations. Skills will include informal conversation, identifying equipment, "how-to" directions, basic commands, stating job needs, telephone conversations, resolving disagreements, and discussing other workplace issues. Job site observations and note taking will be important components of the course.

Spanish 123
Spanish for Law Enforcement Personnel will train participants to communicate effectively with Spanish-speaking personnel and the community. The four main objectives of the course are to produce Spanish sounds correctly, pronounce necessary Spanish words intelligibly, communicate specific protocols, and issue the Miranda warning and waiver.

English for Academic Purposes
A variety of courses are offered for students who are not native speakers of English and need additional preparation before taking transfer-level courses with developmental prerequisites. Specialized courses meet developmental needs and address the specialized needs of non-native speakers.

Self-Instructional Language Program (SILP)

  • Arabic 111-112
  • Chinese 111-112
  • German 111-112
  • Italian 111-112
  • Japanese 111-112
  • Polish 111-112
  • Portuguese 111-112
  • Russian 111-112

The courses offered through the SILP method focus on an independent approach with reliance upon tutorial guidance from a native speaker. The goal is to develop listening, speaking, and reading skills as initial steps to achieving language competence. Emphasis is given to intensive drill, practice, and review through listening to tapes and conversation among students and with the drill tutor. Tests are administered by an outside examiner certified by the National Association of Self-Instructional Language Programs (NASILP), Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

© 2012 Joliet Junior College

Joliet Junior College
1215 Houbolt Road, Joliet, IL 60431-8938
Phone: (815) 729-9020