Michael Thune
English & World Languages
Department Chair
Office: C-1049
Phone: (815) 280-6663
Email: mthune@jjc.edu

JoAn Pollack Ayorinde
English & World Languages
Department Secretary
Office: C-1050
Phone: (815) 280-6633
Fax: (815) 280-6730
Email: jpollack@jjc.edu

Literature Courses 

An open book 

ENG 103 - American Literature
This course is a study of representative selections in American prose and poetry from 1608 to 1865. It satisfies humanities or literature requirements for transfer. Prerequisite: "C" or better in ENG 101 or consent of instructor.

ENG 104 - American Literature
This course is a study of representative selections in American prose and poetry from 1865 to the present. It satisfies humanities or literature requirements for transfer. (Prerequisite: "C" or better in ENG 101 or consent of instructor.)

ENG 105 - Survey of English Literature
This course is a study of the first thousand years of English prose and poetry from Old English through the 18th century. It explores not only the development of various types of literature and the language itself, but also the origin and development of many ideas that are central to our modern culture. It satisfies humanities or literature requirements for transfer. (Prerequisite: "C" or better in ENG 101 or consent of instructor.)

ENG 106 - Survey of English Literature
This course is a study of English prose and poetry of the Romantic, Victorian, and Modern eras. It explores not only the development of various types of literature, but also the development of modern attitudes resulting from changing concepts about the nature of people and their relationship to nature and society. It satisfies humanities or literature requirements for transfer. (Prerequisite: "C" or better in ENG 101 or consent of instructor.)

ENG 107 - Contemporary Literature, 1900-1950
This course explores the literary movement called "modernism" by examining the prose masterpieces of some of the 20th century's greatest writers: Joseph Conrad, James Joyce, Marcel Proust, D.H. Lawrence, Virginia Woolf, Thomas Mann, Franz Kafka, and Samuel Beckett. Texts include: Heart of Darkness, Dubliners, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Swann's Way, Selected Short Stories, The Waves, Death in Venice, The Metamorphosis, and Watt. Students will have an opportunity, through an outside reading project, to encounter other important modernists, among them Frederico Garcia Lorca, Luigi Pirandello, Hermann Hesse, and Jean-Paul Sartre. Prerequisite: "C" or better in ENG 101 or consent of instructor.

ENG 108 - Contemporary Literature, 1950-present
This class will focus on world masterpieces, often of an experimental nature, written after 1950. Texts wil include Alejo Carpentier's The Lost Steps, Jorge Luis Borges's Collected Fictions, Gunter Grass's The Tin Drum, Gabriel Garcia Marquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude (an example of "magical realism"), Alain Robbe-Grillet's Jealousy (an example of the "nouveau roman" or "new novel"), Italo Calvino's Cosmicomics, Milan Kundera's The Unbearable Lightness of Being, Vladimoir Nabokov's Pale Fire (a novel in the form of footnotes to a poem!), and Art Spiegelman's Maus I + II (a novel in comic-book form!). These are all original and exceptional artists who have created some of the last century's most influential works. (Prerequisite: "C" or better in ENG 101 or consent of instructor.)

ENG 109 - Children's Literature
This course is a study of literature for children from the preschool to adolescent age levels. It is recommended for future teachers, teacher aides, and parents.

ENG 120 - Creative Writing
This course is an introduction to creative writing. It is writing-intensive and designed to give students opportunities to express themselves in poetry, fiction, and drama and to understand the craft of writing "from the inside" rather than analyzing it from the outside as a literature student. Students will read and respond to work by professional writers and fellow students in a "workshop" format. The basis for success in the course is not the quality of the student's imagination, but the quality of participation as a writer and reader.

ENG 190 - Introduction to Film Study
Formerly COMM 190, this is a beginning course exploring how film communicates. Sociological issues related to film, the relationship of film to literary genres, and important historical developments in the evolution of film art are explored. Films will be shown in almost every class session.

ENG 208 - Masterpieces of Western Civilization
(Western Literature in Translation)
This course is a study of representative works in western civilization from the time of the Old Testament to the Renaissance, with emphasis on works other than English and American. It explores not only a variety of major literary works, but also the ideas expressed therein and their impacts on other cultures. It satisfies the humanities or literature requirement for transfer. (Prerequisite: "C" or better in ENG 101 or consent of instructor.)

ENG 209 - Masterpieces of Western Civilization
(Western Literature in Translation) This course is a study of representative works from western civilization from the Renaissance to the present, with emphasis on works other than English and American. It explores not only a variety of major literary works, but also the ideas expressed therein and their impacts on other cultures. It satisfies the humanities or literature requirement for transfer. (Prerequisite: "C" or better in ENG 101 or consent of instructor.)

ENG 220 - Non-Western Literature in Translation
This course is a study of selected literary works by Asian, African, and Latin American male and female writers of the 19th and 20th centuries. This course explains not only a variety of major works, but also the ideas expressed therein and their impacts on their own and other cultures. It satisfies humanities or literature requirements for all transfer students and "third world" requirements for education majors and others. (Prerequisite: "C" or better in ENG 101 or consent of instructor.)

ENG 250 - Introduction to Shakespeare
In this class, students will be exposed to a representative sampling of Shakespeare's poems and plays. Selected sonnets and eight plays will be read during the semester: three tragedies (Hamlet, Othello, and King Lear), two comedies (A Midsummer Night's Dream), one history (Henry the Fourth Part One), one "problem play" (Measure for Measure), and one romance (The Tempest). Students who have read Shakespeare before and those who have had no experience with Shakespeare are encouraged to take this class. This course satisfies the humanities or literature requirements for transfer. (Prerequisite: "C" or better in ENG 101 or consent of instructor.)

ENG 260 - Minority American Literature
This course is a study of the literary and cultural traditions of Native Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, and Hispanic-Americans as expressed in the literature of these groups. This course satisfies the humanities or literature requirements for transfer. (Prerequisite: "C" or better in ENG 101 or consent of instructor.)

ENG 270 - Introduction to Women Writers
This course is a study of fiction and non-fiction prose, poetry, and drama written in English by women from the 17th century to the present. Common themes explored by women writers from various time periods and diverse backgrounds are discussed. This course satisfies the humanities or literature requirements for transfer. (Prerequisite: "C" or better in ENG 101 or consent of instructor.)

© 2012 Joliet Junior College

Joliet Junior College
1215 Houbolt Road, Joliet, IL 60431-8938
Phone: (815) 729-9020